Photography

Where I'm Coming From

David Cameron announced in February 2011 that multiculturalism in Britain had failed. As the son of immigrants, born in the UK I reacted to this with trepidation and the mildest tinge of relief; the relief being that if there is a wasp in the room, as the saying goes, you at least want to know where it is. I still believe London is one of the most racially tolerant places to live, and it is always a pleasure to mix with Indians, Poles, Jamaicans, Chinese, Cockneys, Kurdish, and share the feeling that wherever we may be from originally, if you have never gone on the London Eye and know how to get home at three in the morning then you have to the right to call yourself a Londoner.

On the Remarkability of Arcades

On the Remarkability of Arcades

The Arcades series started as part of John L Tran’s 2006 PhD research into nostalgia in Japanese landscape imagery. It is now being expanded to cover sites in Europe and the United States.

‘The city writes its own script. Things are always much stranger than they seem’, wrote the London stroller and novelist Iain Sinclair (The Guardian, 14 July 2005). The written script, however, can be vocalized too as another distinctive novelist of the city John McGregor writes, ‘the city, it sings, so listen, there is more to hear’ (If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things, Bloomsbury, 2002, pp. 1-2).

Gonkar Gyatso

Gonkar Gyatso
 *1961 in Lhasa, Tibet

Studied Fine Art in Beijing and London.

He is the founder of the contemporary Tibetan art gallery The Sweet Tea House and is currently based and working between London and Beijing.  

Gonkar Gyatso is a Tibetan born British artist. Born in 1961 in Lhasa, Gonkar moved to London in the late 90's on scholarship to the Chelsea School of Art and Design, where he attained his MA in Fine Art. (Gyatso studied Chinese Brush Painting in Beijing, attaining a B.F.A. and Thangka (traditional Tibetan scroll painting) in Dharamsala). He has been living and working in the West ever since.

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